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Thank you for showing interest in my frames. Wyganowski Frames is Paul Wyganowski, a fourth-generation custom frame builder who hand-builds and hand-finishes each custom bicycle frame - a rarity in these dark days of sand blasting being the current standard finishing practice. I was taught to utilize skill and technique rather than most builders in this day and age whose frames are manufactured with production building methods to produce their custom frame sets. I began building custom bicycle frames in 1989 even though my tutelage started in 1985. Besides building custom handcrafted bicycle frames, and, I build triplets, recumbent, and professional-grade custom unicycles of all types, giraffes and multi-wheeled unicycles. All the products I build are tailored specifically for the individual in fit, design and style. In addition to fabricating, I have a stock of bicycle frame building supplies and tube sets for sale from the 1960s to the 1990′s. Most are vintage from Reynolds, Columbus, Ishiwata, Takahashi, Tange, Gipieme, Prugnat, Bocama, and Haden.point.  I do repairs and restorations and teach frame building – just like my direct predecessor Tim Paterek. I am an advocate of educating people about the craft and defining what I believe is a true custom, hand-crafted frame set.

I build with mainly with steel and was the first Minnesota builder to build with high grade stainless steel tubing back in the mid 90s. I build with all brands of steel but have always leaned towards Italian steel. I prefer KVA stainless, I do not generally build with 953 due to its mechanical disadvantage of not being able to manipulate the tubes in a manner I like with out cracking. KVA is the exact same alloy of stainless with better mechanical traits. The best thing about these new martensitic stainless alloys is that they are very easy to build compared to Aermet 100 alloy frames, that I had built back in 1995. Using these materials will also remove the necessary evil of painting the frames. Paint has always bothered me as it is the weakest aspect of the frame, but needed for steel to prevent corrosion. I will eventually set up for titanium, but as my current schedule is I do not see it happening for quite a long time.

I offer lugged silver-brazed and fillet (both bronze and silver fillet) frames. I primarily TIG weld all my recumbent and giraffe unicycles. I do not offer any TIG  bicycle frame sets at this time.

A note on frame weights. My frames weight an amount, This will vary from frame to frame, their respective sizes and tube draws used. The weights will range from 3 lbs to over 4 lbs. I do not condone or support super light frames just safe stable riding frames. If weight is one of your top concerns, then you should go carbon, aluminum, or titanium although light is not as near so as the first two so you should go with them. I have noticed one thing over the years and through personal experience is that pushing the weight envelope decreases the durability, stability and safety of a frame. My frames are very competitive when considering frame weights. My weight savings comes from tricks I use or have modified from my fore-bearers techniques and adapted to all the the frames I build. These are subtile and unseen but allow me to cut unnecessary steel where it is not needed. Thus not hurting the performance or integrity of my frame sets. I believe the bar has fallen far too low and many consumers are either ignorant of real quality manufacturing processes, or simply assume that they are receiving the highest quality product from a builder. I have been building over two decades and I have had training and education of my craft from two custom builders whose craft was learned from another custom builder not a volume or production shop like some and many others who take a one or two week frame building class that barely touches the surface of the craft.

You will not find fluff or a fancy site – I am a frame builder: this site is about informing and promoting how I build bikes and expect frames to be manufactured. The lack of photos is due to my inability to have any time to do so. I like to build and deliver my frames in a timely fashion and due to my old school mentality I rarely ( really never) take photos of them during the build.

During my time building, I have tested and experimented with a wide variety of processes to ensure what I do is the best way to construct a frame set. The quality and soundness of the frame has always been my priority, not production and show.

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